Safer L.A.

ROADMAP TO COVID-19 RESPONSE IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES

Safer at Home
On March 19, in response to the urgent need to protect Angelenos from COVID-19 and save lives, Mayor Garcetti joined L.A. County leaders in issuing an emergency Safer at Home order. The order called on L.A. residents to stay in their residences and limit all activities outside of their homes beyond what is necessary for essential tasks. 

Safer L.A.: Making adjustments to Safer at Home
Until there is a vaccine or effective treatment, COVID-19 will continue to be a serious threat to our health. We must learn how to live with this new reality and begin to safely and gradually take steps forward.

Guided by public health experts, and working collaboratively with regional leaders, Mayor Garcetti and the City of Los Angeles are approaching our response to COVID-19 in stages. On May 8, we implemented the first adjustments to the Safer at Home restrictions, and are continuing to roll out modifications on an ongoing basis.  

We will continue to monitor risk and adjust our approach as necessary to limit the spread of the virus and safeguard against overwhelming our hospitals.

The road ahead is long and will not always be linear. At times, we will take steps forward — at other times, we may have to pause or even take steps back if needed to save lives and protect our city.

This difficult chapter will require the patience and collaboration of all Angelenos. We must act as one — fighting to keep Los Angeles safe and healthy, and protecting our friends, families and neighbors. We will get through this together.


STAGES OF COVID-19 RESPONSE AND RECOVERY

Stage I of this crisis — where Los Angeles was between the implementation of the Safer at Home order on March 19 and May 8 — was crisis management mode, focused on saving as many lives as possible.

On May 8, the City and County of Los Angeles entered Stage II, beginning the process of slow and gradual adjustments to the Safer at Home order. Physical distancing, face coverings and other hygiene and safety measures will remain in place and will be even more important.

In the third and fourth stages, the City will transition to a state of monitoring, and aim to lift additional restrictions. In the fifth and final stage, the City will be fully reopened and turn attention to reimagining itself in a post-COVID-19 world.

Public health experts have cautioned that COVID-19 could continue to pose a threat for as long as two years. Stages will gradually become less restrictive as they progress. Key milestones must be reached before the City can transition to the next stage of recovery.

This decision-making process is rooted in the cycle of the disease.

A person begins showing symptoms of the virus within two weeks. Within three to four weeks, people are hospitalized. It typically takes three to six weeks to more fully understand how each decision impacts the spread of the virus, and the capacity of the hospitals and health infrastructure to respond.

Mayor Garcetti will continue to work with leaders at the County, State and Federal levels to make decisions and keep the public informed at each stage of the process.

A timeline of reopening


STAGE TWO: OUR NEW REALITY

On May 8, the City and County of Los Angeles transitioned to Stage II, making minor adjustments to some restrictions of the Safer at Home order. On May 13, Mayor Garcetti announced an order requiring all Angelenos wear face coverings when outside their homes. 

In Stage II, retail stores are allowed to offer deliveries or curbside or doorside pick-up. Car dealership showrooms may open for sales with adherence to distancing and cleaning and infection control protocol. Restaurants will remain closed for dine-in guests.

In Stage II, some retail establishments are allowed to offer online/phone orders and curbside pick-up, including: florists, toy stores, music stores, bookstores, clothing and shoe stores, and sporting goods stores. Car dealership showrooms may open for sales with adherence to distancing and cleaning and infection control protocol. Restaurants will remain closed for dine-in guests.

GUIDANCE FOR BUSINESSES

Trails, trailhead parks, and golf courses have reopened, but Angelenos must still adhere to appropriate physical distancing protocols and wear face coverings.

During this stage, Angelenos are continuing to wear face coverings at all times in public, avoid gatherings and non-essential activities, and stay at least 6 feet from all individuals who are not a part of their household. Everyone must continue to stay home as much as possible.

 

Co-Existing with COVID-19: Guidance for Angelenos in Our ‘New Reality’ When in public or after being in public, Angelenos should: 1) wear face coverings when exiting your home and interacting with others; 2) keep 6 ft. between you and other residents; 3) scrub your hands with soap and clean water for at least 20 seconds after touching frequently-used items, such as door handles, gas pumps, shopping carts or cashier touchscreens and PIN pads; 4) adopt non-contact salutations, such as waving; 5) routinely clean high-touch surfaces such as doorknobs, phones, and car steering wheels, using soap and water, followed by a disinfectant; 6) avoid non-essential personal and leisure travel; 7) not share or eat communal food and drink at any gatherings.  When at your workplace, interacting with others, Angelenos should: 1) wear face coverings when interacting with coworkers, visitors, and patrons; 2) keep 6 ft. between you and coworkers, visitors, and patrons; 3) scrub your hands with soap and clean water for at least 20 seconds after using the restroom, and after touching frequently-used items, such as door handles, keyboards, credit card kiosks, countertops, and steering wheels; 4) adopt non-contact salutations, such as waving; 5) routinely clean high-touch surfaces and objects using soap and water, followed by a disinfectant; surfaces and objects in public places, such as shopping carts and point of sale keypads, should be cleaned and disinfected before each use; 6) avoid non-essential work travel; 7) not share or eat communal food and drink at the workplace. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additional information at coronavirus.lacity.org.


KEY INDICATORS

Public health data and medical advice will guide the City of Los Angeles through the stages of response and recovery. The County of L.A. has defined seven key public health indicators that will enable public health experts and government officials to determine whether the COVID-19 crisis is improving, staying the same, or worsening — and to then take action accordingly. These indicators will evolve in the coming weeks as our knowledge of COVID-19 and its effects grows and both the State and County continue to develop their key public health indicators.

These indicators are being used to monitor Stage II and will guide future decisions about when to loosen or tighten restrictions over the coming year. In addition, Mayor Garcetti is monitoring a wide array of other detailed public health and safety data and will continue making this information available to the public. Click here for definitions of key indicators.

A list of key indicators: Hospital and ICU capacity, PPE Supply, Testing Capacity, Case and contact tracing, COVID-19 death rate, Hospitalization rate, Testing for high-risk populations